In the Beginning

[No copy of the May 1975 issue of Ashland Directions has been found. The following history selection may have been the one printed.] So far as is known, the first white men to visit the territory which Ashland now embraces were John Oldham, Samuel Hall, and two others, who in 1633 traveled from Watertown to the Connecticut River in search […]

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Magunco

This name is the name of an Indian Village that once stood on the south side of the Sudbury river and it has become intimately connected with the town in that it has been applied in these later times to the first hand fire­ engine, to one of the markets, a club, and the hill on whose slope the village […]

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The Devil’s Den Revisited

I generally try to avoid revisiting places we have been before, but if there is a significant change to a historic place it warrants another look. When the new Ashland High School was designed, careful consideration was given to the impact a facility of its size would have on the surrounding areas. A lot of the focus was on the […]

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The Old Connecticut Path

I have had a lot of requests to do a story on the infamous “Pout Rock,” but in order to do it justice we need to look at the larger picture. Pout Rock is part of the Old Connecticut Path. A trail originally used by the Indians dating back before the early 1600s, Old Connecticut Path, or The Bay Path […]

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Eliot, Gookin, and the Magunkaquog

A common name around Middlesex County is Eliot. You would be hard pressed not to see a signpost in Ashland, Natick, or any other of our neighboring communities that didn’t have “Eliot” in it somewhere. Most of us remember John Eliot as the Puritan that “converted the heathens and ministered the settlers” around the middle of the 17th century. A […]

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